Sermon on Zoom for the Fifth Sunday after Trinity, 12th July 2020

Isaiah 55.10–13

Romans 8.1–11

Matthew 13.1–9,18–23

http://bible.oremus.org/?ql=461593578

Maybe there is something a little bit superfluous about preaching a sermon about Jesus preaching a sermon. You couldn’t really improve on the message of his Parable of the Sower. Everybody who has had anything at all to do with Christianity has surely heard that one, and they remember it.

And it is certainly a good and encouraging message: pay attention, make sure you take things to heart, don’t be put off by distractions. Distractions: I think the expression is ‘displacement activities’ – you know, when you are a student, instead of writing your essays, you sharpen all your pencils – which is rather like the people who fall away in Jesus’s story.

Don’t be a fair weather Christian. Don’t give your soul to Jesus too lightly; you know, don’t come out to the front at a Billy Graham meeting, or maybe even get confirmed and have a big party afterwards – don’t do all that, if after all, you’re going to find that it is all a bit inconvenient, so you don’t bother much afterwards.

I’ve been reading a very interesting book called ‘Climate Crisis, the Challenge to the Church’, by David Rhodes. (ISBN 978 1 83858 081 0). It’s a different take on our Christian belief, in many ways.

When I was reading the book, this very parable, the Parable of the Sower, came to my mind. In his book, David Rhodes is putting forward the idea that Jesus, whatever else he was, was a revolutionary. A lot of the famous sayings of Jesus are consistent with this. You know, ‘The last shall be first’; ‘Blessed are the poor’ (poor in spirit, actually, but still poor); ‘He hath sent the rich away empty’; you know, the opposite of conventional wisdom. You could indeed say there is quite a lot of quite revolutionary stuff. Not so much spiritual, as subversive.

This parable could be a training session, a training session for his revolutionary followers. I’m sure that a lot of us have attended those sort of courses, (even though we’re not revolutionaries); but at work, you know, training you how to do various bits of your job more effectively.

A lot of those training sessions talk the same sort of language that Jesus used in his parables. None better than the Parable of the Sower. It’s no good just parroting things and doing nothing about them; no point not having any staying power; no point not resisting distracting temptations. That works for a middle manager just as much as for one of Jesus’ followers on the beach. Or for revolutionaries.

When I first wrote this sermon, my example of this sort of training session was a Labour Party canvassing course for young activists run by Momentum; and the temptation, the distraction, that I imagined at this point was that the Young Conservatives might have had prettier girls. But of course I couldn’t possibly say anything like that in a sermon, could I?

In politics, you must keep on sticking faithfully to the party message: and eventually you will be rewarded; you will become prime minister. Or, in following Jesus’ example, if you persevere, there will be salvation. Or, is it really, revolution?

Well, you can take the parable of the sower as revolutionary training, or on another level it can be perfectly OK in Sunday school or, indeed, after the Sunday roast, when Dad mutters something about what a nice service it was and how he couldn’t quite remember everything that the vicar said in his sermon, but that it did make a lot of sense at the time. Parable of the Sower; spot-on.

You might want to do a little bit of reading around today, because there are some other lovely Bible lessons in the lectionary for this Sunday. One of them in particular I just want to mention to you for comparison with the Parable of the Sower, to give you something to discuss over your roast beef – or your midnight feast in Australia or brunch in Canada or the United States. We are a very widely separated congregation!

The other lesson which I want to mention for comparison is the epistle today, which is from St Paul’s letter to the Romans, chapter 8. The passage is at the beginning of the chapter. ‘There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.’ St Paul makes a big contrast between the Jewish law, the Ten Commandments, the law of Moses, and the law of the spirit, making a distinction between the flesh and the spirit. Paul says, ’But you are not in the flesh; you are in the Spirit, since the Spirit of God dwells in you. …But if Christ is in you, though the body is dead because of sin, the Spirit is life …’ Romans chapter 8, verses 1 to 11, if you want to look it up this afternoon.

In this book which I am reading, David Rhodes makes the point that, although St Paul was amazingly influential in spreading Christianity, stopping it being just a narrow Jewish sect, and becoming a worldwide religion instead, so that Saint Paul was called the apostle to the Gentiles – the apostle to us, in fact (at least those of us who are not Jewish as well as Christian) – and although in fact some of St Paul’s letters are the earliest documents in the New Testament, written before the Gospels, only 30 or 40 years after Jesus’s death – even so, St Paul never once tells us what Jesus said, what he preached and taught. There are none of Jesus’ sayings, none of his famous parables, in St Paul’s letters.

Instead St Paul has this much more cerebral, much more philosophical approach, maybe in order to get the non-Jewish world to accept Jesus and become Christian. He had to bring Christianity within the tradition of ancient philosophy, the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle and Cicero, in order to give it intellectual respectability, rather than sticking with homely sayings to gaggles of unsophisticated people crowding round a guy on the beach or floating in a boat just offshore, as Jesus was, when he told them the Parable of the Sower.

But which of these two passages do you remember? Do you remember St Matthew’s Gospel, the Parable of the Sower, or Romans 8? You are all good churchgoers, so if you read ‘There is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus’, it will probably ring a bell with you. But I’ll bet that it doesn’t ring as loud a bell as the Parable of the Sower. So, let’s take a moment for reflection. What do you think? Are you fired up by the revolutionary message of the Sower? Or would you rather stick with some armchair philosophy with St Paul? Which is the more powerful message?

Even so, although you know the Parable of the Sower pretty well, is it actually working like an ear-worm, so that what was ‘sown on good soil bears fruit and yields in one case a hundredfold, in another 60 and in another 30’? Does it make you do things? Does it make you not just sign up to petitions online; not just click on YouTube?

I do wonder why St Paul didn’t quote any of Jesus’ sayings, even the straightforward ones like this one. Could it be that they were what we would call “too political”? Too risky? Who is right? It’s dangerous stuff. But it is stuff that we must think about. Is it time for something revolutionary?

Well, as you digest that thought, maybe it won’t be too long before we get back into church, and then before too long I hope we will be able to sing a hymn or two again. I couldn’t resist mentioning to you that the Old Testament lesson prescribed for today is another lovely one. It is Isaiah chapter 55:

For you shall go out in joy,

   and be led back in peace;

the mountains and the hills before you

   shall burst into song,

   and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands …

Did you sing that as a hymn at school? I certainly did. On YouTube I’m sure you’ll be able to find a link to a good choir singing it, so you can sing along too, maybe in the bath – but remember! – first you’ll need a bit of Jesus’ revolutionary training.

For you shall go out in joy,

   and be led back in peace …

and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands …